Chapel of the Transfiguration, Grand Teton National Park

Chapel of the Transfiguration


With the Tetons as a background, visitors come to the Chapel of  the Transfiguration to exchange wedding vows and/or to simply take in its awe-inspiring views.

  • The Chapel of the Transfiguration is a favorite spot for photographers, sightseers and weddings.
  • Built in 1925, the chapel still functions as an Episcopal church and is operated by St. John's Episcopal Church in Jackson, Wyoming.
  • Services are held at the Chapel from late May to early September each year.

Overview
The rustic log Chapel of the Transfiguration sits on a rise just within the southern entrance of Grand Teton National Park. A large window behind its altar frames the magnificent beauty of the Teton Mountain Range. 

It has become a favorite spot for photographers, sightseers and weddings.

Location/Directions
After entering Grand Teton National Park at Moose Junction, turn off Teton Park Rd. onto Chapel of the Transfiguration Rd., 1.1 mi north of Moose Junction.

Seasons
Depending on the severity of the winter, the Transfiguration Chapel can be accessible year round. However, it is only open to the public and for weddings and/or religious services from May to September each year.

St. John's Episcopal Church offers services at 8:00am and 10:00pm during the summer season.

Activities

  • Sightseeing
    As a part of the history of Jackson Hole, this historic chapel is on many individuals’ sightseeing lists.
    It played a primary role in the movie Spencer’s Mountain, which was filmed in Jackson Hole in 1963, and featured Henry Fonda and Maureen O’Hara.
  • Weddings
    The Chapel is still a functioning Episcopal Church. Couples come here to exchange vows with the Tetons as a backdrop.
    Arrangements for the use of The Chapel of the Transfiguration in Grand Teton National Park must be made directly with the church:
    Chapel of the Transfiguration
    c/o St. John's Episcopal Church
    P.O. Box 1690
    Jackson, WY 83001
    (307) 733-2603
    Website

There is no additional permit required by the Park Service, however, admission fees to the Park due apply. Additional fees for the private use of the Chapel is at the discretion of St. John’s Episcopal Church.

Additional Info
This tiny chapel built in 1925 on land donated by Maud Noble is still a functioning Episcopal church. It was constructed so that the early settlers would not have to make the long buckboard ride into Jackson for Sunday services. The structure also served guests and employees of the dude ranches that stretched north of Jackson along the base of the Teton Range.


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